Maximizing Employee ROI

“There are probably as many stereotypes about today’s workforce as there are workers. Consider two of the most enduring: Employees are cubicle-bound clock-watchers, getting by doing the minimum possible. Or, at the other end of the spectrum, employees are ambitious “free agents,” loyal to themselves and their careers, but not to their employers.”

– Towers Perrin Global Workforce Study

I personally feel that employees, in general, should be very willing to go the extra mile, if they have got the right “deal”. Before falling prey to such stereotypes about employees being ‘clock-watchers’, it will be prudent to ask oneself if we have done enough to incentivize the right behviours – behaviours that maximize individual and group performance. HR and line managers need to work together to maximize “employee ROI”. Isn’t it intuitive? A typical employee spends almost 8-10 hours in office. She definitely wants to maximize her ‘returns’ from the time and effort she puts in. Employees are eager to invest more of themselves to help organizations succeed – and will do so if they see the personal ROI. Now, the key task cut out for HR executives and managers is to structure this “deal”.

The study has also identified critical drivers (at a global level) for attracting and retaining talent.

Top 5 Attraction Drivers:

– Competitive base pay

– Career advancement opportunities

– Challenging role

– Convenient work location

– Flexible schedule

Top 5 Retention Drivers:

– Company reputation

– Satisfaction with the organization’s ‘people’ decisions

– Relationship with supervisor

– Clear understanding of career path within the company

– Work-life balance

Of course, the drivers and components of the ‘deal’ will vary across cultures, industries and has to be seen in the light of market realities. But, such inputs can go a long way in optimizing the Employee Value Proposition using a scientific and realistic approach.

Do share your thoughts on maximizing employee ROI.



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